New Guide Helps Leaders Advocate for SNAP E&T Programs

Posted November 15, 2017, By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Seattle Jobs Initiative, with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, has released The SNAP E&T Advocates Guide, which serves as a blueprint for leaders interested in helping states develop and expand skills-based SNAP E&T programs.

SNAP E&T, which stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training, is administered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service. Each of the 53 state SNAP agencies operate an E&T program, which aims to assist members of SNAP households in gaining the skills, training and experience needed to help them obtain regular employment, according to the USDA.

Interest in developing these programs is high. Among the reasons why: More than half of all SNAP households are led by someone with a high-school diploma or less, and E&T support can play a vital role in helping these individuals compete for jobs in today’s rapidly changing labor markets.

Because states can be hesitant to build skill-based SNAP E&T programs or may not know where to begin, advocates have an important role to play in advancing these efforts. Leaders in policy, philanthropy, workforce development and other sectors can partner with state SNAP agencies to supply the information and assistance needed to drive E&T programming.

To help with this effort, The SNAP E&T Advocates Guide identifies both advocacy strategies and common roadblocks that may be preventing states from growing their SNAP E&T programing. Seattle Jobs Initiative has also released a SNAP E&T Messaging Tool, which is available as a generic version and one that states can customize. This tool outlines key program messages and helps advocates describe SNAP E&T to new audiences. In addition, it describes the program’s need, how it works and how it benefits both participants and employers.

Go to The SNAP E&T Advocates Guide

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